LinkedIn   Facebook   RSS






LD/ADHD Memory Tips

Improving memory

LD/ADHD and Working Memory

We all worry about failing memories and rely upon organization and mnemonic tricks to help us stay on top of everything. However, your learning disabled child will struggle even more. I’m sure there are times when you must think they are purposely ignoring you or they got distracted. In truth, it might be their memory that got in the way.

LD and ADHD students often have a weak working memory. This memory is different from the immediate short term memory. Working memory is the ability to hold something in one’s conscious thought and manipulate and use it at the same time. Students who have slow processing speed and written language difficulties also struggle with working memory. Working memory allows students to follow directions, to remember a question while raising their hand to answer it, and hold on to the new information they need to apply to the work. In reading, working memory aids our comprehension, making it possible to organize and summarize the text and connect it to what we already know. In writing, it lets us juggle the thoughts we want to get on paper while keeping the big picture in mind.

LD/ADHD Memory Tricks

  • Make certain they have a quiet study space that is theirs. The material they need to learn must be the most interesting thing around.
  • Aim for comprehension before memorization.
  • Learn using as many senses as possible. We retain:
    – 20% of what we read
    – 30% of what we hear
    – 40% of what we see
    – 50% of what we say
    – 60% of what we do,
    – 90% if we involve 3 or more senses
  • Mnemonic devices such as :
    – Visualization
    – Mind Maps and chunking information into meaningful categories
    – Rhyming Sentences (every good boy deserves fun)
    – Acronyms (HOMES for the Great Lakes)
    – Rhymes and alliteration (30 days hath September…)
    – Jokes
  • Don’t study for longer than 1 hour at a time – take SHORT BUT REGULAR BREAKS . Studies have proven that we remember more of what is studied at the beginning and end of a session so have as many beginnings and endings as possible.
  • Start to prepare early as the brain needs time to consolidate the information. Cramming works for very few.



Comments


  1. Dear Ann,

    Thank you for all the wonderful information you have shared on your website. After reading over many of the topics I feel empowered to continue working with me son and his school.