LinkedIn   Facebook   RSS






Procrastination – What, Why & How

Procrastination

Procrastination Assessment

Sure, we all put off a few unpleasant tasks, but psychologists say that some of us poison our success with chronic procrastination. Is your child a chronic procrastinator? Try this simple quiz to find out…

They procrastinate excessively if you agree with five or more of the following statements:

  1. They often put off starting a task they find difficult.
  2. They often give up on a task as soon as they start to find it difficult.
  3. They often wonder why they should be bothered doing a task.
  4. They often have difficulty getting started on a task.
  5. They often try to do so many tasks at once that they don’t finish any.
  6. They often put off a task in which they have little or no interest.
  7. They often try to come up with reasons to do something else.
  8. They often ignore a task when they are not certain about how to start it.
  9. They often start a task but stop before completing it.
  10. They often think that if they ignore a task, it will go away.
  11. They often cannot decide which to begin first.
  12. They often find their minds wandering off to other things.

Why Do Students Procrastinate?

There are many reasons why students procrastinate. Here are the most common reasons:

  1. Perfectionism: A student’s standard of performance may be so high for a task that it does not seem possible to meet that standard.
  2. Fear of Failure: A student may lack confidence and fear that he/she will be unable to accomplish a task successfully.
  3. Confusion: A student may be unsure about how to start a task or how it should be completed.
  4. Task Difficulty: A student may lack the skills and abilities needed to accomplish a task.
  5. Poor Motivation: A student may have little or no interest in completing a task because he/she finds the task boring or lacking in relevance.
  6. Difficulty Concentrating: A student may have too many things around that distract him/her from doing a task.
  7. Task Unpleasantness: A student may dislike doing what a task requires.
  8. Lack of Priorities: A student may have little or no sense about which tasks are most important to do.

How Can I Help My Child Overcome Procrastination?

Here are some things you can do to control excessive procrastination.

  1. Motivation and Positive Self-Talk. “There is no time like the present,” or “Nobody’s perfect.” “The sooner I get at it the sooner I’m free” etc.
  2. Make a schedule of the tasks you have to do and stick to it.
  3. Prioritize the tasks you have to do.
  4. Set clear goals and be specific with time. Set a timer.
  5. Work on tasks at the times they are most alert and positive.
  6. Break large tasks into small manageable parts.
  7. Work on difficult and/or unpleasant tasks first.
  8. Work on a task you find easier after you complete a difficult task.
  9. Work on tasks as part of a study group.
  10. Get help from teachers and other students when you find a task difficult.
  11. Find a good place to work on tasks.
  12. Eliminate distractions that interfere with working on tasks.
  13. Set reasonable expectations that you can meet for a task. Don’t be a perfectionist!!!
  14. Take breaks when working on a task so that you do not wear down.
  15. Rewards when the task is done.

Leave a Comment